What Countries Does Australia Have A Free Trade Agreement With

Australia has trade initiatives or trade agreements with the countries or groups of countries listed in the table below. The Australian government did not have a majority in the Senate and therefore needed the support of the opposition Labor Party, the Greens, democrats or independent senators to get ratification. The government put a lot of pressure on Labour Party leader Mark Latham to get opposition support for the deal (knowing that among many Labour members, Latham saw the free trade deal as beneficial). The issue had divided the party, with the Left Party in particular arguing that Labour should reject the deal. The full text of the agreement, as well as useful information and fact sheets on free trade agreements, are available on the website of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade. If you have specific questions about the agreement, email ChinaFTA@dfat.gov.au or call the DFAT on 02 6261 1111. Importers can contact the Ministry of the Interior. Among other things, the agreement provides rules for the settlement of disputes between members of the telecommunications industry in one country and members in the other. It allows companies to: This section recognizes the rights and obligations of Australia and the United States to each other with respect to addressing trade barriers. These rights and obligations have been defined in the WTO Agreement on Technical Barriers to Trade, which deals with, inter alia, standards, regulations and conformity assessments. The section on rules of origin describes the rules for determining the origin of traded goods in order to determine eligibility and the method of determining the value of traded goods. Free trade agreements (FTAs) are international agreements that remove or eliminate certain barriers to trade and investment between two or more countries.

Australia currently has 11 free trade agreements with 18 countries and is trying to negotiate and implement additional agreements. In addition, this section describes the cooperation between customs authorities to ensure the implementation of the rules of the Agreement and describes the possible measures that can be taken if the exporting country acts in bad faith. Article 19.2 states: ”The Parties recognize that it is inappropriate to promote trade or investment by weakening or reducing the protection afforded by their respective environmental laws. While companies in particular have criticized the process by which drugs are listed in the pbS, saying it lacks transparency, public health advocates have argued that the demands for transparency are just an attempt by pharmaceutical companies to gain more control over the listing process. . . .