U.s.-Mexico-Canada Agreement

Canada ratified the agreement in March and the USMCA came into force on July 1, 2020. Although NAFTA is officially dead, governments and businesses are still adapting to the new rules, especially the new labour rules. Coronavirus can also complicate implementation as manufacturers adapt to new guidelines in the midst of a global economic crisis. The USMCA establishes the highest level of a U.S. trade agreement for strong and effective protection and enforcement of intellectual property rights. This is a significant enhancement of NAFTA. Nevertheless, in December 2019, following negotiations on the revision of the USMCA text signed in November 2018, substantial changes were made to Chapter 20 of intellectual property. The negotiations focused ”primarily on car exports, tariffs on steel and aluminum, as well as the milk, egg and poultry markets.” A provision ”prevents any party from enacting laws that restrict the cross-border flow of data.” [11] Compared to NAFTA, the USMCA increases environmental and labour standards and encourages domestic production of cars and trucks. [12] The agreement also provides up-to-date intellectual property protection, gives the U.S. more access to the Canadian milk market, imposes a quota for Canadian and Mexican auto production, and increases the customs limit for Canadians who purchase U.S.

products online from $20 to $150. [13] The full list of differences between USMCA and ALEFTA is listed on the Website of the United States Trade Representative (USTR). [14] NAFTA has three primary dispute resolution mechanisms. Chapter 20 is the settlement mechanism for countries. It is often considered the least controversial of the three mechanisms, and has been maintained in its original form from NAFTA to the USMCA. In such cases, complaints filed by USMCA Member States against the duration of the contract would be violated. [48] In Chapter 19, the justifications for anti-dumping or countervailing duties are managed. Without Chapter 19, the avenue of recourse for the management of these policies would be through the national legal system. Chapter 19 provides that an USMCA body hears the case and acts as an international commercial tribunal to arbitrate the dispute. [48] The Trump administration has attempted to remove Chapter 19 of the new USMCA text, which until now existed in the agreement. Trade policy is a subject that does not necessarily come to mind when you think of the FDA.

But in fact, there are two reasons why the FDA is closely following trade policy: protecting our rules and authorities and using trade agreements as a vehicle to promote public health.